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Diet Tips For Healthy Kidneys

Diet Tips For Healthy Kidneys

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Dr Joycelyn

Diet Tips For Healthy Kidneys

 

Diet Tips For Healthy KidneysDiet Tips For Healthy Kidneys. Your kidneys are important to keep your overall health. This pair of kidney-shaped organs filters product wastes from your blood and throws them all out through your urine. Aside from producing urine, your kidneys also help in regulating your blood pressure, keeping your bones stay strong and making healthy red blood cells.
Drink lots of water to stay hydrated
Keeping yourself well-hydrated helps keep your kidneys functioning well. Your urine should look straw-colored or even paler. If your urine looks darker, then it is a sure sign that you need to drink lots of water to correct your dehydrated. The recommended amount of water you need to drink every 24 hours is 8 glasses – that is roughly 2 liters of water per day. You should never substitute your water needs with any sugar-containing drinks, says Kidney Health Australia. Drinks that contain sugar or caffeine may cause or even worsen health problems.
Eat a healthy and well-balanced diet
Eating a healthy and well-balanced diet ensures you that you are taking in all the essential nutrients, vitamins, and minerals to keep your kidneys, as well as all the other organs within your body, healthy. Eat lots of colorful fruits and vegetables. Moderate your fat and salt intake. A study published by Journal of Nephrology states that high intake of salt can overload and damage your kidney’s function, causing it to enlarge, thicken and become stiff.
Don’t drink too much alcohol
Your kidneys can tolerate a little alcohol. However, drinking too much of it can damage not only your kidneys but also other organ systems within your body. Your kidneys filter the harmful substances within your body – and that includes alcohol. Alcohol changes the way your kidney functions causing them to filter your blood less, explains the National Kidney Foundation. Alcohol also dehydrates your body, thereby affecting the normal functions of your cells, tissues and organs, including your kidneys.
Having a healthy diet is important if you want to preserve the normal function of your kidneys. Observing these diets tips can keep your kidneys on the go. Staying healthy and eating healthy can keep your kidneys healthy too.

Dr. Jocelyn Ibanez-Pantaleon is a physician and a professional blogger. Her greatest passion is to share her knowledge about disease prevention through healthy living. Through her articles, she strives to make a difference by educating patients about chronic health problems, such as kidney diseases, hypertension, and diabetes.

Learn more about Diet Tips For Healthy Kidneys on this website.
Dr. Jocelyn

Reference:
Kidney Health Australia: Drink to satisfy thirst – water is the recommended fluid!
Journal of Nephrology; Sal Intake and Kidney Disease; Boero, R. et al; May-June 2002
National Kidney Foundation: Alcohol and your kidneys

Common Causes Kidney Disease

Common Causes of Kidney Disease

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Dr Joycelyn

Common Causes of Kidney Disease

 

Common Causes Kidney DiseaseCommon Causes of Kidney Disease. We all do it: we take over-the-counter medications to treat common health problems without thinking about the possible side effects they can give. Oftentimes, we use drugs we know to manage certain ailments without consulting a qualified health care provider.  Drugs are one of the most common causes of kidney disease and end-stage renal failure. With the US adult population getting older by the minute, it is not hard to figure out why more and more people expose themselves to therapeutic medications that can potentially harm their kidneys. In this post, we will discuss the top three drugs you may be taking that can cause potential injury to your kidneys.
Analgesics
Not all analgesics are created equal – some may be relatively safe for your aging kidney while others can cause renal injury, or in worse cases, acute renal failure, when used inappropriately and habitually. Aspirin and acetaminophen are two of the most common medications we use to treat mild headaches and pains. MedlinePlus states that 4 out of 100,000 individuals develop analgesic nephropathy, the damage to the kidneys resulting from overexposure to analgesics, such as aspirin and acetaminophen. If you are using 6 pills per day to treat your pains for three consecutive years, then you are at risk for developing this problem.
Antihistamines
Diphenhydramine and doxylamine, two drugs commonly used to treat allergies, can sometimes cause rhabdomyolysis, the breakdown of skeletal muscle fibers that results in red or cola-colored urine, decreased urine output, general muscle weakness, muscle tenderness or stiffness and muscle aches. A study published by Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation says that rhabdomyolysis causes acute kidney injury in 33 to 50 percent of cases, acute kidney injury that ultimately leads to untimely dialysis.
Chinese herbals
Most people believe that herbal medicines are not harmful. However, some herbal medicines can, in fact, harm the body. According to a study published September 2008 by American Family Physician, Chinese herbal medicines that contain aristocholic acid, a carcinogenic and kidney-toxic compound, can cause chronic interstitial nephritis, a mild to severe kidney problem that causes the kidney tubules to become swollen and produce decreased amounts of urine.
Over-the-counter medications may sound harmless, but taking them too often can do you more harm than good. Consulting your physician is still the best option if you are experiencing some health problems or are concerned about Common Causes of Kidney Disease.

Reference:
MedlinePlus: Analgesic Nephropathy
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation; Acute kidney injury due to rhabdomyolysis; Lima, R.S. at al; September 2008
American Family Physician; Drug-induced Nephrotoxicity; Cynthia A. Naughton; September 2008

Dr. Jocelyn Ibanez-Pantaleon is a physician and a professional blogger. Her greatest passion is to share her knowledge about disease prevention through healthy living. Through her articles, she strives to make a difference by educating patients about chronic health problems, such as kidney diseases, hypertension and diabetes.
Dr. Jocelyn

Fast Food and Kidney Disease

Fast Food and Signs of Kidney Problems

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Dr Joycelyn

Fast Food and Signs of Kidney Problems

 

Fast Food and Kidney DiseaseFast Food and Signs of Kidney Problems is becoming a problem for many people.

Eating fast food is not a good idea, especially if you have kidney problems. However, there are some instances when you could hardly keep yourself from eating those too-tempting-innocent-looking-yet-truly-harmful foods. So, what’s a kidney patient to do?  Do you really need to stop eating fast food in order to avoid complications? Can fast food really harm your already-diseased kidneys?
Year 2011: Fast food chain giants such as Mc Donald’s and Burger King announced that they are going to make their foods healthier. However, as reported by a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, the healthfulness of food products served by fast-food chains has not changed since 2005. Here are the top three reasons why you should never eat in fast food chains especially if you are having kidney problems:
Fast foods are loaded with sodium
Sodium – that is the salt in your food – overloads your kidney and it can further compromise the health of this pair of organs. Fast foods are loaded with sodium. In fact, 80 percent of the sodium consumed by the American people come from foods served from these food chains, says the said study published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
Fast foods contain too much phosphate
Before you drink that can of soda and take a bite on that delicious burger, listen to this: Having a high level of phosphate in the blood is an important determinant of possible mortality and morbidity in patients having chronic kidney disease. Fast food chains serve processed foods and drinks that contain tons and tons of phosphate, which can surely further damage your kidney functions, states a study published November 2013 by PLos One. Kidney diseases cause decrease phosphate excretion in the urine thereby causing phosphate retention within the blood.  Too much phosphate within the body results in excessive cellular and tissue damage which could greatly worsen the condition of patients who have kidney problems.
Fast food causes kidney stones
Adding more insult to an already diseased kidney is definitely a no-no – and that is what you are exactly doing when you eat fast food. Your body needs some protein, a little calcium and some phosphorus to function normally. However, too much of these can trigger kidney stone formation in some susceptible individuals. Eating too much (and on a regular basis) in restaurants that serve foods loaded with protein, calcium and phosphorus can’t do anything healthy for you, says the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC).  Instead, these foods can possibly cause you to have kidney stones, which can further complicate your kidney problem.
Avoiding foods served in fast food chains is important if you want to prevent your kidney disease from worsening. Eating healthy meals is essential to improving your kidney function and overall health condition. Don’t become a statistic regarding Fast Food and Signs of Kidney Problems.
Reference:
JAMA Internal Medicine; Changes in Sodium Levels in Processed and Restaurant Foods, 2005 to 2011; Jacobson, M. H. et al; June 2013
PLos One; Inadequate Awareness among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Regarding Food and Drinks Containing Artificially Added Phosphate; Shutto, Y. et al; November 2013
National Kidney and Urologic Diseases
Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC): Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention

Dr. Jocelyn Ibanez-Pantaleon is a physician and a professional blogger. Her greatest passion is to share her knowledge about disease prevention through healthy living. Through her articles, she strives to make a difference by educating patients about chronic health problems, such as kidney diseases, hypertension and diabetes.
Dr. Jocelyn

Hypertension and Kidney Disease

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Dr Joycelyn

 Hypertension and Kidney Disease

Hypertension and Kidney Disease go hand in hand.

High blood pressure can gradually and quietly damage your body parts for years before symptoms may start bothering you. Without proper control, it can leave you with a disability and poor quality of health. Fortunately, it’s easy to control – that is, if it is not associated with other health diseases, including kidney problems. Listed below are the top three things your doctor may not be telling you about hypertension and its possible association with kidney disease:
Hypertension can sometimes cause renal disease
Hypertension can damage your blood vessels.  When the pressure of the blood flowing within your blood vessels is high, your blood vessels stretch. This stretching scars and weakens your blood vessel walls, including those within your kidneys, explains National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. This damage within the blood vessels of your kidneys leads to inefficiency in your kidney function resulting in sub-optimal removal of wastes and extra fluid from the body. With the presence of extra fluid within your body, your blood pressure further shoots up, leading to a vicious cycle.
Some anti-hypertensive medications can complicate certain renal diseases
Hypertension can cause renal disease; however, some antihypertensive medications (such as ACE inhibitors) can, in fact, complicate certain renal problems. Many doctors use angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, also known as ACE inhibitors (example: captopril, enalapril, lisinopril), to manage hypertension in patients with chronic renal failure. Physicians find these medications helpful in decreasing the pressure within the very small blood vessels of kidneys while minimizing the amount of protein that goes out with the urine of patients with renal failure. However, ACE inhibitors are contraindicated in patients with renal artery stenosis, a kidney problem that commonly happens as a result of fatty plaque deposition within the kidney artery wall. Do you want to know the reason for this contraindication? These medications can push patients with renal artery stenosis to develop acute renal failure, the sudden shutdown of kidney function, says a study published by Pharmacotherapy.
Renal disease can lead to hypertension
Some medical conditions, including certain kidney diseases, can cause high blood pressure – a health problem doctors refer to as secondary hypertension. Contrary to essential hypertension, the commonly encountered kind of hypertension that happens without a clear cause, secondary hypertension can occur as a result of other health problems that affect your heart, kidneys, arteries and endocrine system. The most common renal diseases that cause secondary hypertension are glomerular disease, the swelling of the kidney’s waste filter system, and renovascular disease, the narrowing of one or both arteries that supplies blood to the kidneys, says Mayoclinic.com.
Reference:
National Kidney and Urologic Disease Information Clearinghouse: High blood pressure and kidney disease
Pharmacotherapy; Acute Renal Failure Secondary to Angiotension II Receptor Blockade in a Patient With Bilateral Renal Artery Stenosis; Wargo, K.A. et al; 2003
Mayoclinic.com: Secondary hypertension

Dr. Jocelyn Ibanez-Pantaleon is a physician and a professional blogger. Her greatest passion is to share her knowledge about disease prevention through healthy living. Through her articles, she strives to make a difference by educating patients about chronic health problems, such as kidney diseases, hypertension and kidney disease.
Contact Dr. Jocelyn at Google+

Kidney Problems in Pregnancy

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Dr Joycelyn

Kidney Problems in Pregnancy

Signs of Kidney Problems in Pregnancy is more common that you think. The urine you submitted for pregnancy test came back positive. Your heart leaped for joy. You can’t contain your happiness. You have to tell everyone close to you about the good news. Suddenly, your heart sank. The burst of joy now gone – and that is because you just remembered: you have chronic renal failure.
Pregnancy causes a myriad of changes within the female body. It slightly changes the way some major organs function to accommodate and sustain the growing life within your uterus. The urinary system also undergoes some predictable physiological changes during pregnancy, changes that also happen even if you have chronic renal disease.

Listed below are the top four things you need to know about chronic renal disease in pregnancy:
Chronic renal disease in pregnancy is not common
There are only a few cases of chronic renal disease in pregnancy. According to a study published by Obstetrics and Gynecology, chronic renal disease in pregnancy only happens in 0.03 to 0.12 percent of all pregnancies in the United States.
Many maternal complications can happen because of chronic renal disease
Chronic renal diseases can cause diverse complications in pregnancy including: (1) preeclampsia, the development of high blood pressure after the 20th week of pregnancy; (2) worsening of kidney function; (3) preterm delivery; (4) anemia, the condition of low red blood cell level; and (5) possible delivery through caesarian section.
You have a good chance of having a healthy baby despite your renal problem
It’s true: you will encounter many obstacles and health complications during your pregnancy because of your kidney problem; but this doesn’t mean you can’t have a healthy baby after all you have been through. A study released by Obstetrics and Gynecology reveals that mothers with chronic renal disease have a 64 to 98 percent chance of delivering a healthy and very much alive baby despite their kidney problem and this all depends on the severity of the renal insufficiency and presence of high blood pressure during pregnancy.
Chronic renal disease in pregnancy is medically manageable
Are you are pregnant kidney patient? Don’t lose heart. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy is medically manageable. However, your obstetrician needs to make a multidisciplinary approach to make this happen. Your physician may need to manage you in a tertiary hospital setting, together with a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist present, to assess and manage your case, says another study published by Obstetrics and Gynecology. After giving birth, you still need to have regular visits and monitoring of your kidney function (up to 5 years postpartum) to ensure your utmost health and safety.
Reference:
Obstetrics and Gynecology; Chronic renal disease in pregnancy; Ramim, S.M. et al; December 2006
Obstetrics and Gynecology; Management of women with chronic renal disease in pregnancy; Kopoor, N. et al; 2009

Dr. Jocelyn Ibanez-Pantaleon is a physician and a professional blogger. Her greatest passion is to share her knowledge about disease prevention through healthy living. Through her articles, she strives to make a difference by educating patients about chronic health problems, such as kidney diseases, hypertension and diabetes.
Dr. Jocelyn